Mad Events

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Marchers holding signs marching in the Mad Pride Parade in Toronto 2016We had a great time marching in the Bed Push Parade – Mad Pride March in 2016. We showed our strength in the community and made lots of noise along the way! We marched from the Parkdale Library along Queen Street to Trinity Bellwoods Park.

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Image: Music Notes Floating Over a Yellow Moon

Now is the time to raise your voice! And Hear Ours!

Our strengthPoster for Raised Voices Event. Background image is an opera singer dressed like a viking. comes from sharing our Mad talents and Mad spirits. Join us this Thursday, February 2, 2017 at 8:00 at the Gladstone Hotel, Ballroom. Let us know you are coming via our Raised Voices Facebook event.

Raised Voices – Performers

Dr. Anderson

Hailing from the mysterious university town of Peterboroughshire-upon-the-Ottonabee, Dr. Anderson is a Rock and Roll Musician bent on ruining the perceptions of the allegedly sane.

Jenny

Jenny has been a mad activist in the community since 2012. She is experiencing a creative reawakening after a long dry spell.

Quarry Bay

Quarry Bay is a musician, producer, ethnographer, and anarchist based in Toronto and Hong Kong. His music and studies focus on anti-racism, madness, and the inevitable demise of the capitalist nation state. He is currently interested in examining how madness and oppression intersect.

Asante

Asante is a spoken word artist who mesmerized audiences at both the July Mad X and the November Mad X. Here he is making his Gladstone debut.

Tom Theriault

He is a Toronto musician who is part of the Kensington Market music scene / community for the past 25 years. Tom is a Proud Mental Health Survivor!.

Donna Linklater

Donna is a maniac. The most apt insult she’s ever received was “Soviet Barbie”.

Felix and the Threesomes

Felix is an eclectic retro hippie far beyond perfume and bohemian; but Felix is a people person who is poly-amorous towards everything in life. The Threesomes music can be described as being folk with lyrics that are love-fantasy. Ladies and gentlemen open your hearts to Toronto’s very own, Felix and the Threesomes.

Stacey Bowen

Stacey Bowen is a short story writer who mixes fiction with non-fiction around human life-struggles. She is also a trained Motivational Speaker who advocates for changes to Social Polices and more subsidized Housing.

Stacey values her job that deals with helping the homeless population, and working with people living with mental illness and addictions by doing her frontline job as Shelter-Relief Worker at Fred Victor.

Mr. Bittersweet

Mr. Bittersweet has been playing music in Toronto for about 30 years and performed and entertained in about 600 instances for mainly community events. Besides being a singer/songwriter and self-recording artist, he is also a writer, painter and generally a multi-media artist, including technical and promotional theatre works. Over the years He worked with about 200 different artist, a majority of them based in the community mental health system and often ‘psychiatrized’. (more…)

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What does advocacy mean? Advocacy is about speaking or acting on behalf of a disadvantaged person (or group), defending their wishes or rights, and remaining loyal and accountable to them despite pressures to do otherwise. Advocacy is also about changing systems for the better by influencing policy, practices, or laws in ways that will benefit people in our community and protect their rights. It requires commitment, focus, and skillfulness.

Advocacy is about speaking or acting on behalf of a disadvantaged person (or group)… Advocacy is also about changing systems

If you are a person with “lived experience,” a “peer,” or a “consumer” then please understand that this, in and of itself, is not valid enough

Photo: Marchers carrying signs, walking down Queen Street. Text: "Right to be Free Right to be Me"
Mad Pride Bed Push 2017

criteria to be a good advocate. While your identity and your experiences (especially as related to mental health) matter, they alone are not sufficient to challenge some of the tricky and complex institutional and governmental powers influencing our understanding of psychiatric disability and the distribution of resources (e.g. housing, services).

If you are a person with “lived experience,” a “peer,” or a “consumer” then please understand that this, in and of itself, is not valid enough criteria to be a good advocate.

I start with this controversial point because over and over again, the most popular advocacy “line” people offer at consults, focus groups, proceedings, etc. for ethical dilemmas and problems with the mental health system is to ask whether “peers were included,” or if, “peers gave feedback.”

Lately, I have challenged this knee-jerk response, because it is predicated on an assumption that if “lived experiencers” were involved in complex systemic issues, they would somehow be offering substantive or innovative feedback for change. Sometimes yes, but often no – not without research into a problem, or speaking with people most impacted, or developing relationships with supportive allies.

In fact, sometimes the very problems occurring in the system are reproduced via individuals who identify as “peers” or people with “lived experience.” Sometimes these peers adopt excessively cheerful or optimistic views of healthcare system delivery as opposed to critiquing it.

They contort themselves to accept clinical or policy justifications and in so doing become extensions of the system through their actions, words, and ability to be socially acceptable and conformist. I have seen examples of peer workers counselling hospital patients on their “best interests” as opposed to listening or following a patient’s instructions and hearing what would allow them to feel they have more control over their lives. There are very few advocacy and human rights campaigns being spearheaded by peer labourers though I think there is powerful potential for organising for change if community capacity were prioritized in this direction.

Thankfully, there are however a number of individuals and small organisations doing collaborative and innovative work to improve the lives of people who are on the margins and addressing advocacy issues related to violence, housing etc. There are smart, organized, coordinated and focused efforts that work to change and improve specific problems thanks to thoughtful planning, thorough research, and earnest selflessness.

We need more strategies like this which are focused on understanding how the system makes economic and policy decisions and directions. It would be great if younger activists and individuals interested in advocacy would create support groups looking at how to better understand the system, what ethical principles we should collectively adopt going forward, and more importantly how to meaningfully evaluate what has worked and not worked in the past for us – by us.

…create support groups looking at how to better understand the system, what ethical principles we should collectively adopt going forward, and more importantly how to meaningfully evaluate what has worked and not worked in the past for us – by us.

I also suggest that our community develop an extremely inquisitive appetite for scrutinizing anything that sounds like “inclusion.” The system knows it is supposed to be “inclusive” – that is not news to people in power, but what kind of inclusion is happening? We consumer/survivors advocated for inclusion years ago, and now we (to some degree) have it, but at what cost, and what kinds of identity and ideas are being included? An advocacy issue that currently needs attention is the Ontario government’s recently passed Bill 41, also known as the Patients First Act on December 7th, 2016.

This Patients First Act aims to ensure patients are at the centre of the health care system. Are there any consumer/survivor groups organising around this? Probably not. Who will monitor advocacy and the new discussions about accountability in a changing landscape within healthcare? The Psychiatric Patient Advocate Office, which is no longer at arm’s length from the Ministry of Health, is going through re-evaluation of its services to better align itself with Ministry initiatives such as the Patients First Act. What will this mean?

If we are to re-invigorate a movement that believes in justice, advocacy, and the protection of rights, we need a new approach that understands that while some gains have been made, there are many other losses we have not even begun to process—let alone respond to intelligently. The landscape of advocacy is changing and the fire of the past has dwindled.

We have fewer advocates. This is true amongst different groups and social movements looking for change.

The pendulum has definitely swung in disturbing directions, but it will swing back. In the meantime, we must be more aware of the losses of certain rights and be more resolute in our efforts to critique “inclusion,” especially the ways it has been used by neoliberal agendas that expend with both advocacy and individuals who cannot thrive in capitalism.

Written by Lucy Costa

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Here is some inspiring music leading up to Raised Voices at the Gladstone Hotel, Toronto, on February 2, 2017.

“The Cuckoo” by Banjo Rebellion (“Banjo Rebellion got its name when Val Kerr & Bill Nunnelley, partners in life and in music, answered the call for rebel performers at the Toronto MadX event, aptly named “The Rebellion”.

And Donna Linklater

And

Raised Voices at the Gladstone Hotel, Toronto, on February 2016.
Raised Voices at the Gladstone Hotel, Toronto, on February 2, 2016.

 

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Text reads "WINTERPRIDE" Image: A cabin in the snow.

 


Toronto Mad Pride wishes you a great, warm, delicious, peaceful and Mad holiday season

 
Would you be interested in meeting up over the holidays with other fun, weird and or mad people? Follow us over to the Toronto Mad Pride Facebook Page.
 
 

With the holidays and winter weather here, we thought it’d be good timing to remind you of a few services and resources available in Toronto:

 

The Consumer/Survivor Info Centre

Checkout the special December issue of The Bulletin for:

Community support listings
Workshops
Employment and training
Things to do over the holidays

 

The Toronto Drop-In Network (TDIN) – Holiday Meals
 
Image: Red Cardinal sitting on branches covered with ice and snow.

Follow the Meal list then click for a PDF file
 

 

211 Toronto – for community, social and health service questions:

211 Ontario website: http://211ontario.ca/

 

311 Toronto for general City of Toronto services (including winter weather issues) – they are reachable 24/7 by phone

Tel: 311 within Toronto / 416-392-CITY (2489) outside Toronto
TTY customers: 416-338-0TTY (0889)
E-mail: 311@toronto.ca
Web: toronto.ca/311
Twitter: @311toronto

 

Toronto Hydro

If people or property are at risk, always call 911 first.

For electrical emergencies (such as downed lines), call Toronto Hydro immediately at 416-542-8000 and press option 1 to reach the emergency dispatch department. If you are unable to reach Toronto Hydro call 911 for police or fire.

https://outagereport.torontohydro.com/
Twitter: @TorontoHydro

 

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Help out with the Mad Music Show & DirectoryMad Garage Sale – EVENT, and Mad Outreach (Learn, help, connect)

Mad Music Directory  (Lots of shows and help to promote Musicians!)

Image: Rainbow stylized musical notes and sound waves
Feel the good Mad Music! Mad Pride Music Directory and Fun!

 

Mad Garage Sale – EVENT Facebook (October 22, 2016)

Image: Older woman at a table with vintage plates and sales
Get together and buy some great gear!

Mad Outreach

EVERYTHING we do is outreach and connection building community. We are particularly excited about reaching new communities.

Get involved in general as a volunteer.